Well camouflaged in a thick layer of ivy near the remains of the former Truro-Newquay Railway is New Chiverton Consols. It was also known as New Wheal Chiverton and Old West Anna, sometimes being referred to as Calley Mine

new chiverton mine

Opening in 1863 this mine started and remained a small venture. Employing just 50 people, it changed hands a few times, but ultimately closed in 1877. 

new chiverton mine

The engine house present today is a 40″ pumping engine erected in 1868, which alongside a 4 HP crusher, was put up for sale in 1877. Prior to this there was another 40″ engine on the site, this bought second hand from Wheal Alfred in 1864.

new chiverton mine
Shafts
Lodes
Output
Shafts

Shafts include New Engine (65 fathoms/119m), Flat Rod (40 fathoms/73m) and Whim (20 fathoms/37m)

Lodes

North, South, No 1, No 2 and No 3.

Output

1864-78
300 tons (304,814 kg) of 75% lead, 1,300 tons (1,320,861 kg) of silver, 640 tons (650,270 kg) of zinc, 15 tons (15,240.7 kg) of pyrite and 25 tons (25,401.2 kg) of arsenic. 

new chiverton mine
Access
Parking
References
Access

The engine house sits alongside a public footpath, although the house itself and its shaft are unconsolidated and private. 

Parking

There is some very tenuous parking alongside the nearest road, however be mindful as people drive very quickly up past to Goonhavern. 

References

Acton, B. (2005) Around Perranporth, St Agnes and Portreath. Truro: Landfall Publications.

Dines, H. G. (1956) The metalliferous mining regions of south-west England. British Geological Survey.

Nance, D., Brown, K. and Clarke, T. (2019) A Complete Guide to the Engine Houses of Mid-Cornwall. Lydney: Lightmoor Press.