Situated just north of the Great Eastern Highway is a small disused water catchment area that forms Boondi Rock.

Now a small campsite, this area was once one of many catchment areas dotting the edges of the railway, forming a chain of essential water supplies for the old steam engines that travelled from Perth to Kalgoorlie. It was built at some point in the 1890’s along with the railway. Large granite slabs and smaller rocks were used to channel water from the higher ground behind into a lake. For a great deal of time before this, the granite rocks provided a good deal of gnammas for Aboriginals.  

Boondi Rock

Despite the trains being switched to new locomotives some time ago, the rock and concrete lined channels still do their job and form a pretty pond.

Boondi Rock

The spot is an excellent spot for wildlife watching, with the water encouraging all manner of creatures from kangaroo, lizards and emus to smaller birdlife. There is also a short hiking trail that winds up the granite outcrop behind.

Boondi Rock

Boondi was the site of a trail derailing in 1918. While the passengers were preparing for breakfast just 73 miles (118km) out from Kalgoorlie, were thrown without ceremony off the tracks, although thankfully with few injuries. Mr Seddon, an electrician on board, quickly got on the phone and in no time another train was mustered from Kalgoorlie and a gang of men were gathered to right the train and fix the tracks. By dinner time all passengers and mail had safely reached Kalgoorlie on the second train.

Boondi Rock

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